"BEWARE" A SPECIAL REPORT:

I was recently contacted by an old college friend who was going through a divorce and foreclosure.  He said he received a UPS delivered box with no return address (1st red flag).  When he opened the box, he found blank 'American Express' money orders totaling $5,000 (2nd red flag) along with a note.

The note said, if you cash these money orders, you can keep ten percent and mail the remainder to this address (3rd red flag).  The address was in Nigeria.  The note also urged my friend to deposit 'all' of the money orders at once (4th red flag).

I told my friend to take the box with the contents and note to the local police station or to the postmaster.  He didn't listen because he desperately needed the money to get out of debt.

He cashed half the money orders and spent the money on bills.

The following week, he got an urgent call from the bank, telling him that the money orders were counterfeit.  He is now under investigation by the police, they think he is involved in the counterfeit ring.

This is becoming a common scam and a large majority of the people who receive these counterfeit money orders are going through financial debt.  These are the people who seem to be targeted.  These counterfeit rings must have a list of people who have credit debt or bankruptcy on their credit reports.

Another friend of mine opened a small business and she attends night school.  When she told a fellow classmate that she had just launched a business, he asked her, would she be interested in making his friend in Nigeria one of the board of directors so he could possibly relocate to the United States?  He also offered her a large fee.  She declined because she didn't know the friend and he could have been a criminal.

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