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DANGEROUS & DECEITFUL:

One of only two doctors serving the remote community of Kipling, Saskatchewan, Dr. John Schneeberger (pictured above) was highly regarded by his patients -- until one of them charged him with drugging and raping her.

Asserting his innocence, Schneeberger submitted to two blood tests, and both times, his DNA did not match the sperm found in the alleged victim.  Undaunted by the doctor's subsequent acquittal, his accuser hired a private detective.  The investigator obtained additional DNA samples from Dr. Schneeberger, via a stolen chapstick and a licked envelope. The DNA isolated from these items matched the sperm.

In a separate action, Schneeberger's wife accused him of raping her daughter (his stepdaughter). Police took new samples and matched DNA from Schneeberger's hair, saliva and blood (collected from a finger) with the sperm from his former patient.  It was discovered that in order to avoid detection, Schneeberger had surgically inserted a plastic tube (demonstrated above right), filled with another patient's blood, into his left arm.  When the lab technician drew blood from Schneedberger's arm, the blood was actually coming from the inserted tube.

Another victim would come forward, Dr. Schneeberger would also be convicted of sexually assaulting this patient twice, once in 1994 and again in 1995 but the judge acquitted him on a charge of using a sedative in those attacks.  He was also found not guilty of endangering a life with improper use of drugs.

During the trial, Schneeberger admitted placing a plastic tube full of a male patient's blood into his arm in an effort to trick the police investigating the women's allegations against him.

On three occasions, in 1992, 1993 and 1996, a lab technician withdrew blood from his arm for police but in each case the sample came from the tube instead of the vein.

At first, police doubted the women's allegations because the DNA blood samples did not match the rapist's semen.

Detectives eventually charged the doctor after obtaining a sample of his hair, which matched the semen but not the earlier blood.

In addition to sexual assault, Schneeberger was convicted of obstructing justice.

A small crowd jeered him as he was handcuffed and led away from the courthouse.  Headed to prison, to serve a six year prison term.

Dr. Schneeberger wanted to stay in contact with his two daughters behind bars.  A court ordered visit by his daughters never took place.  Lisa Dillman brought the two girls to the prison and was greeted by a huge crowd who blocked the way to the prison.  Once inside the prison, before they saw Schneeberger, the two little girls burst into tears, grabbed their mother's legs and begged to go home.

A social worker then stepped in to stop the encounter before it took place.  Dillman said, "I'm glad it's over.  I'm just relieved it's over.  I just want to go home and take my little girls with me."

The scene was repeated when the girls were brought back 4 weeks later.

This story is depicted in the 2003 film, "I Accuse."

Sources: "HBO Autopsy," and "CBS News"

 

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