AIDS SERIAL KILLER:

Michael Lupo (pictured above) is a former choir boy who served in an Italian elite army commando unit before dedicating his life to sadomasochism and hairdressing. 

In 1975 Michael moved to London where he started as a hairdresser and worked his way up to owning a styling boutique.

He apparently called himself “The Wolf Man,” and racked up about 4,000 gay lovers and developed a taste for the whip and built a modern torture chamber in his house.  It all turned ugly in March of 1986 when Lupo was diagnosed with having AIDS.

He then started his bloody rampage against the gay night life scene.  Over a period of two months he slaughtered four men who he picked up in gay bars and left their bodies slashed beyond recognition.

After two potential victims escaped, police arrested Mike on May 15.  He received four life sentences and presently police in Berlin, Hamburg, Los Angeles and NYC are investigating mutilation deaths that might be linked to Lupo's travels.

On March 15, 1986, a 37-year-old man named Alex Kasson was found murdered in a derelict flat in Kensington, London.  The investigation did not make much progress as it was apparent there were no obvious ties between killer and victim.

On April 6 that same year, Anthony Connolly, 24, was found murdered on a railway embankment in Brixton.  He had been strangled to death with his own scarf.

Because Connolly had been sharing a flat with a man who was HIV positive, there was a long delay between the discovery of the body and the post mortem because the coroner wanted to make sure Connolly was not himself infected with HIV.

This created serious tensions between the authorities and the gay community, the latter accusing the former of dragging their heels and not taking the death of a homosexual man seriously enough.

Six weeks later, on May 18, Michael Lupo was arrested and charged with the murders of Anthony Connolly and James Burns.

On May 21, Lupo was charged with two other recent killings, those of a young hospital worker named Damien McClusky, who had been strangled in West London, and an unidentified man, who was murdered near Hungerford Bridge over the Thames.

In addition to these four murders, Lupo was charged with two attempted murders.  In 1987, at the Old Bailey, Lupo pleaded guilty to all charges and was given four life sentences, plus fourteen years. 

In February 1995, Lupo died in prison from an AIDS related illness.

He had contracted the disease shortly before his killing spree and he claimed that finding this out was what had set him off on his rampage.

 

EDITOR-PUBLISHER-FOUNDER: MYRA PANACHE
THIS SITE IS UPDATED EVERY 4 WEEKS
ALL RIGHTS RESERVED, TITLE TRADEMARK REGISTER
IN THE U.S. AND POSSESSIONS. PRINTED IN THE U.S.A.

 

return to top